Friday, August 23, 2013

Math ideas to ponder...

I am currently reading the following book:


I am on the 4th chapter and I am LOVING it. I wanted to share some ideas/thoughts I have come across while reading: 

1. "We can make a shift from mathematics as something we simply do to a way in which we live our lives, relate to each other, and wonder about our world (Wedekind)." 

I think that is pretty powerful! Many times we teach our students to "do" math, but we don't look at it as something that surrounds us. If teachers change their thinking then I think they will change their teaching! 

2. The role of the teacher is to provide experiences, but it is the role of the student to raise their own questions and create deeper understanding. 

If the teacher is able to successfully set up math experiences for students that guide them to a deeper understanding, than students are doing most of the work. This is a great shift in the math world for teachers. Our students need to be asking the questions. Our students need to be justifying their answers. Our students need to create their own understanding. 

3. "In order to achieve a deep and true understanding of mathematics, children must first see themselves as becoming mathematicians (Wedekind)."

Wedekind does this by talking with students about mathematician statements. An example would be "Mathematicians are curious." Some statements focus on building a mathematician community, while others focus on a specific process or content. 

Here are come resources:


This one is from Amy Lemons who I love! 


This is a really cute unit on TpT that I liked! 

I hope everyone is having a great Friday! Next week we sign on our house...woohoo! 



2 comments:

Jason Whitaker said...

What is your class make up? I have students who are doing good to CARE about school. So for them to make that jump to now wanting to become mathematicians is going to be intense. I also to check out this book to better understand what my role is in making experiences for my students. Thanks for sharing.

Dinesh Bharuchi said...

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